Thursday, May 14, 2015

Hyacinth Girls by Lauren Frankel

Hyacinth Girls by Lauren Frankel is an all too real novel about the effects of bullying. Two stories unfold simultaneously as the adult narrator tells the story of the girl she is raising, as well as the story of her own friendship with the girl's mother.

From the beginning, Frankel sets a tone of mystery. There are so many questions the first scene creates. Those questions are answered as the two stories slowly unfold. Each revelation brings a new level of understanding. When the narrator switches to the teenage girls, the knowledge she doesn't have that the adults her life do adds a sense of poignancy to the story.

As someone who works with teenagers, the reality of this story hit close to home. Frankel accurately captures the heightened emotions that teenage girls experience as they form friendships and create enemies. The cruelty shown in this novel was so real that as I read how the characters treated one another, I flinched with each verbal blow. Hyacinth Girls is a striking reminder of the power of words to shape one's life, especially at a young age. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the interactions of teenage girls. Both adults and teenagers alike will not just benefit from this story, but will enjoy the ride it takes one on as well.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Friday, May 1, 2015

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly by Matt McCarthy

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly: A Physician's First Year by Matt McCarthy is a first hand account of the author's first year practicing medicine. While McCarthy does share experiences with patients, the majority of this book is about what was going through McCarthy's mind as he transitioned from a scared "doctor" in need of constant supervision, to a "real" doctor capable of handling any situation thrown at him.

McCarthy's honesty about the uncertainty and terror when he first started practicing medicine is refreshing. It also reminds me how human doctors are. As a patient, one wants to feel confidence in their doctor, yet somehow connected, or at least understood. Some doctors are so unapproachable, it can make for an uncomfortable visit. McCarthy details the struggle of finding that balance of investing in patients without getting sucked in and devoured by them.

Anyone interested in the medical field will appreciate this book. Those seeking to better understand the crucible that is the intern year will find this enlightening. Overall, The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly is an enjoyable peek into a world few people experience for themselves, but everyone benefits from.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255