Friday, May 16, 2014

When We Were on Fire by Addie Zierman

 When We Were on Fire: A Memoir of Consuming Faith, Tangled Love, and Starting Over by Addie Zierman could be the story of the life of any number of Millennials one would meet on the street. While the story is a common one, the intensely personal and eloquent way it is communicated sets it apart as something special. Mrs. Zierman shares her journey from a 14 year old "Super Christian" to a thirty something recovering cynic, struggling to consistently engage the Evangelical culture she has alternately embraced and rejected.

I found several parts of Mrs. Zierman's journey that resonated with me. While our paths have not been exactly the same, we were a part of the same culture at around the same time, and the imprints it left on our life are similar. I applaud the brutal honesty with which Zierman shares her journey. I appreciate that she didn't try to tie anything in a nice neat bow or whitewash the ugly parts of her story. She understands the complexity of life in all of its ups and downs. Her retelling of her story is powerful because of that complexity.

When We Were on Fire comes with an author's note, a discussion guide, and an interview with the author. This book would be excellent to read individually or as a small group. While it's told from a distinctly female perspective, Zierman's story carries meaning for both men and women. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys personal narratives, is struggling with Evangelical Christian culture, or anyone open to the subject of faith and it how can shape one's life.

I received this book free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishers as part of their Blogging for Books book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Monday, May 5, 2014

Passion: The Bright Light of Glory by Louie Giglio


Passion: The Bright Light of Glory by Louie Giglio is a collection of sermons based on "some of the most impactful messages ever delivered to Passion-goes over the years" (page 9). Along with Louie Giglio, there are chapters written by Francis Chan, Beth Moore, John Piper, Judah Smith, and Christine Caine. While each chapter has its own theme, the overarching theme is the same of that of the Passion movement as a whole: for Christians to live for His renown.

Anyone familiar with the Passion movement will find familiar content within these pages. This is truly a highlight reel of the movements last several years. It is a testament to the effectiveness of the Passion movement that though I have never been to a Passion event, I was in college when Passion started gaining traction and am thus very familiar with their overall aim. It was nice to read some of the sermons that have influenced my generation. Each chapter bears the style of its author, therefore some were easier to read than others. However, overall each chapter flows really well with the next as well as contributes to the main theme of the book. This isn't always easy to do with more than one author, but Passion: The Bright Light of Glory accomplishes it well. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the Passion movement, Christian living, or taking the pulse of the current young leaders in the of the Christian movement.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255