Monday, August 14, 2017

To Wager Her Heart by Tamera Alexander


To Wager Her Heart by Tamera Alexander is the third book in Alexander's Belle Meade Plantation trilogy. While each book is stand alone and can be read as such, there are the same characters in all three novels. To Wager Her Heart centers around Alexandra Donelson, a young woman in her mid-twenties in Nashville in the 1870s. She wants help educate freedmen, despite her family's belief that it is not appropriate for a young woman of her station.

Alexandra meets Sylas Rutledge, a railroad man from Colorado. Though she has a terrible first impression of him, circumstances keep throwing them together. Eventually a relationship develops between the two of them that blooms into more.

I'm usually not a fan of romance novels. However, the historical aspect of this book made me willing to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. Alexander's writing style flows quickly. The pace was quick but not at the expense of character insight and development. Anyone who enjoys historical fiction or romance novels will enjoy To Wager Her Heart.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Paul the Apostle by Robert E. Picirilli


Paul the Apostle: Missionary, Martyr, Theologian by Robert E. Picirilli is a critical examination of the life and ministry of Paul the Apostle. This is meant to be a middle of the road book, such as a college textbook. Paul the Apostle isn't for the casual reader, nor is it an in depth look at all the minutiae others critically examine.

This is a great resource for pastors and students of theology. It is kind of a slog to read straight through, but since that isn't its intended purpose, that isn't a huge problem. The writing is accessible and the structure is very easy to follow. Whether one wants more information about a particular letter, missionary journey, or time in Paul's life, it is easy to find what one needs. There is also plenty of other resources listed if one does want to take a closer examination of a particular aspect of Paul's life.

I received this book free from Moody Publishers as part of their Moody Publishers Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, See Part 255

Friday, July 28, 2017

Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God by Brian Zahnd

Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God: The Scandalous Truth of the Very Good News by Brian Zahnd is a rebuke against what Zahnd considers the overly wrathful theology of Western Christianity, specifically in America. In fact, Zahnd doesn't believe that in God's wrath at all, only in His love.

Zahnd believes that the perfect expression of who God is is the person of Jesus Christ. Love and forgiveness are the hallmarks of God, not wrath and justice. He examines these concepts in various realms such as hell, Christ's crucifixion, and the kingdom of God.

Zahnd's work is easily readable as well as easy to understand. His thesis is clear and he commits to it fully. However, his theology is nowhere near what would be considered orthodox. The initial premise is interesting, but the way it is spelled out and the implications that follow go to far from the text of scripture. There are several times that assumptions are put on the text that just aren't there.

I cannot recommend Sinners in the Hand of a Loving God to anyone.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Goliath Must Fall by Louie Giglio

Goliath Must Fall: Winning the Battle Against Your Giants by Louie Giglio is a a strong addition to the library of any believer in Christ. Using the story of David and Goliath, Giglio shows how the major giants we all face in life must be defeated because of Christ's work on the cross. Addressing issues such as fear, comfort, and addiction, Giglio shows how these giants are already dead, but still must fall from the power they hold in our lives.

Giglio communicates clearly and precisely. His writing style is very understandable and has an easy flow to it. In Goliath Must Fall, Giglio shares a few new insights into the story of David and Goliath. These "twists" on the story illustrate how the believer has the power of Christ over every giant in his/her life. Christ killed these giants on the cross, but just like a snake head that has been cut off, they can still be deadly. That is why the emphasis in the title is the word must. Though the giants are dead, they can still be deadly, which is why decisions must still be made and work done to allow a believer victory over whatever giant threatens his/her life.

Anyone struggling with the particular giants addressed in this book would benefit from reading it, though I'd recommend it to anyone interested in reading "Christian Living" books. It has a great perspective on the story of David and Goliath that will benefit any believer in Jesus Christ.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

As Kingfishers Catch Fire by Eugene H. Peterson

As Kingfishers Catch Fire: A Conversation On the Ways of God Formed By the Words of God by Eugene H. Peterson is a collection of sermons preached by Peterson over the twenty-nine years he was pastor of Christ Our King Presbyterian Church in Bel Air, Maryland. The sermons are grouped into seven sections of seven sermons, with each group headed by a different figure from the Bible who plays prominently in the section of scripture each sermon is taken from.

Peterson's writings are always filled with rich insights about scripture. The most notable insights in this book are the parallels between the old and new testaments that he points out. In multiple sermons in each section, he draws a parallel that, to me at least, was previously unclear, and once pointed out, adds a new level of richness to those particular scriptures.

Each sermon takes up about six or seven pages. There isn't really a flow to this book since each sermon is self-contained. That can make reading it somewhat frustrating to read unless one approaches it with the right mindset. However, the insights gained and the depths of scripture opened up far outweigh any frustrations. I'd recommend As Kingfishers Catch Fire to anyone interested in the Bible.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

An Outlaw and A Lady by Jessi Colter

An Outlaw and A Lady: A Memoir of Music, Life with Waylon, and the Faith that Brought Me Home by Jessi Colter tells the story of musician/songwriter Jessi Colter and her life with Waylon Jennings. One of the main focuses of this book is the story of Jessi's journey of faith.

Born Mirriam Johnson, Colter's early life was a simple one in the Arizona desert. The daughter of a miner and minister, Colter's life revolved around music from the beginning. She often sang hymns during her mother's revivals. She was encouraged by her family, specifically two of her older siblings. It was through them that she met her first husband who introduced her to the professional side of music. It wasn't until after her first marriage ended and she started a relationship with Waylon Jennings that her professional career gained traction. It was also during this time that she returned to the faith of her childhood. This is what sustained her during the turbulence that being in Waylon's life caused.

Colter's writing style is easy to read and flows really well. Her story is engaging and easy to relate to even though it involves larger than life figures such as Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, and George Jones. The simple but always exciting story of God's redemptive grace is evident in the life of Colter and those around her. Anyone interested in autobiographies, personal stories of redemption, or one of the greats of country music will enjoy An Outlaw and A Lady.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Thursday, May 25, 2017

The Gatekeepers by Chris Whipple

The Gatekeepers: How the White House Chiefs of Staff Define Every Presidency by Chris Whipple examines the modern chief of staff and how every presidency since Nixon's has been shaped by the position. Good or bad, the chiefs of staff have been one of the most influential factors in the legacy of each presidency in the modern era.

Whipple uses mainly primary source material to tell the magnificent tale of the modern chief of staff. He conducted numerous interviews with the chiefs as well as two former presidents. He also had access to previously unpublished material granted him by the individuals involved. How a chief shapes the presidency is the overall theme of this book and the thread that ties each individual story together.

It is the chief of staff's job to protect the president's time. How well he does that plays a significant role in the president's success. He is also to manage the staff and stop anyone trying to go around the proper channels, or trying to execute plans that are just bad ideas such as the Watergate break-in, or the Iran-Contra affair. The chief has to be able to be 100% honest with the president and manage many strong personalities at once.

Whipple tells the story of each chief both from their perspective as well as those who worked with them. At the end of each chapter, I was left wanting to know more about these men and their relationships, as there is only enough space to discuss the high (or very low) points of each chief's time in office. The Gatekeepers is very readable and easy to understand, even for someone who isn't familiar with politics. Part biography, part modern American history, The Gatekeepers is a great read for anyone interested in either.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

The Dawn of Christianity by Robert J. Hutchinson


The Dawn of Christianity: How God Used Simple Fishermen, Soldiers, and Prostitutes to Transform the World by Robert J. Hutchinson uses biblical and extra-biblical sources to historically trace the beginning of "the Jesus movement." Hutchinson starts from a bit before the birth of Jesus and goes through the Jerusalem council.

Each chapter is short and deals with one particular person or event in the formation of Christianity. The writing flows well and is easy to read and understand. There are numerous helpful end notes at the back of the book that provide either sources or more detail, some of which is very interesting.

There isn't really anything new in this book, but it does serve as a great introduction to an important topic for both believers and skeptics. It is organized and informative without going so deep into any one particular topic or scholarly controversy that someone new to the topic would become bogged down. Overall, I recommend The Dawn of Christianity to anyone interested in how Christianity was formed and took root.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Monday, May 1, 2017

The Inkblots by Damion Searls


The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing by Damion Searls is part biography, part history of one of the most famous psychological tests of all times. By examining both the history of the Rorschach test, as well as the life of it's creator, Searls provides a comprehensive look at how the test has both shaped, and been shaped by, culture and popular thought.

Hermann Rorschach was one of the most interesting figures of his time. Peers with men such as Freud, Jung, and Bleuler, Rorschach was able to take the best from all of them, and add thoughts of his own without getting stuck in any one box or school of thought. His open mindedness as well as his not only willingness but desire to see as other's see allowed him to begin to tap into the potential of the human mind. He somewhat stumbled upon what would become his most famous and lasting contribution to his field. Once he realized the great potential of his inkblot "experiment" (as he called it), he spent the rest of his life refining and improving it. If Rorschach had had more time, the potential for what his test could have accomplished is unlimited.

The test itself has weathered far more storms than its creator could have ever imagined. One of the most interesting aspects of Searls examination of the test is how it was shaped not only by trained psychologists, but also by things such as the standardization of medicine in America and the wars between interpretation and hard data. The beauty and simplicity of the test continues to be lost and rediscovered as it is forced into roles it was never created to fill and then reemerges once again to reclaim itself.

Searls' combination of Rorschach's biography and history of his inkblot test provides a thorough and comprehensive look for the layman. There are some parts that are a bit technical, but they are necessary to explain various controversies and interpretations. Overall, The Inkblots is engaging and easy to read both in its pace and clarity. I'd recommend The Inkblots to anyone interested in psychology, the Rorschach test itself, or simply how things are shaped by forces beyond their creator's control or imagination.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Monday, April 3, 2017

Reclaiming Hope by Michael Wear

Reclaiming Hope: Lessons Learned in the Obama White House About the Future of Faith in America by Michael Wear tells the story of one young staffer in the Obama White House. Discussing both personal experience and policy, Wear attempts to put faith and politics, and their relationship to one another, in proper perspective.

Wear worked for both Obama presidential campaigns and worked as a staffer in The White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships during Obama's first term. Wear briefly describes his life before entering the political sphere, before moving on to chronologically discussing events he was involved with in the first campaign and term of the Obama administration. He then covers key policies involving faith and the faith community including abortion and same sex marriage. He then moves on to his involvement in the second presidential campaign and then ends with a broad discussion of how politics and faith can work together.

As a whole, the tone of Reclaiming Hope toward President Obama and his administration is even handed. The first half is almost all positive and almost has a feel of there being no room for criticism, but the second half addresses controversy and legitimate criticism, giving the book as a whole balance. The discussion about faith and politics is constructive and beneficial for any person of faith in America. Recognizing that ultimate hope lies with God, His people still have to engage with the structures of power here on earth. Wear seems to have managed that balance well in his own life, and has made a career of helping others do so as well.

Overall, I'd recommend Reclaiming Hope by Michael Wear to those interested in the faith of President Obama, and/or anyone interested in the intersection of faith and politics in America.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Thursday, March 16, 2017

How to Overcome Worry by Dr. Winifred Neely


How to Overcome Worry: Experiencing the Peace of God In Every Situation by Dr. Winifred Neely is a short, practical guide to dealing with worry and anxiety. Based on a sermon Dr. Neely preached out of the book of Philippians, How to Overcome Worry is a great resource for Christians dealing with what can be a confounding topic.

Dr. Neely equates anxiety and worry, which he defines as, "concern turned inward and deformed, divorced from the grace of God and rooted in unhealthy fear" (pp. 29-30). He makes the helpful distinction between worry, proper concern, and clinical anxiety, noting that concern is appropriate, and a normal part of life and clinical anxiety is the result of living in a fallen world.

Using Paul's letter to Philippi, Dr. Neely provides tips to overcome worry. Keeping one's focus on God by using prayer and scripture meditation, Dr. Neely says that we can find God's peace which, "is the awesome well-being, the glorious serenity, the inexpressible wholeness, and the inner tranquility that characterize the infinite being of God Himself" (p.68).

As one who has dealt with anxiety, I found How to Overcome Worry extremely helpful. It is practical, biblical, and doesn't trivialize or dramatize the subject. It is short and easy to read, and is a great resource for Christians dealing with the topic.

I received this book free from Moody Publishers as part of their Moody Publishers Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, See Part 255

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Enjoy by Trillia J. Newbell

Enjoy: Finding the Freedom to Delight Daily in God's Good Gifts by Trillia J. Newbell is about learning to enjoy all of the gifts of life God has given us. Newbell discusses nine different areas of life such as work, possessions, and creation in which children of God can find delight in Him.

Newbell does a good job of pointing out the broad ideas of enjoyment in each area without crossing into legalism. She always does a good job of mentioning common objections which can prevent people from finding enjoyment in each area. At the end of each chapter, there is something called "The Enjoy Project" that gives practical steps to take to find more enjoyment in the area of life the chapter discusses. Newbell advises the reader at the beginning to keep a journal, or do "The Enjoy Project" with a partner or small group for accountability. There are also discussion questions in the back to use if one does go through Enjoy with a small group.

Overall, Enjoy is a good resource for those who take themselves too seriously, or who have a hard time consistently enjoying life. Joy needs to be cultivated, and this book is a great resource for that.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Monday, February 27, 2017

Is Justice Possible? by J. Paul Nyquist

Is Justice Possible? The Elusive Pursuit of What's Right by J. Paul Nyquist is a primer on why Christians should care about justice and ways in which to pursue justice.

Nyquist begins by defining justice. He then discusses reasons humans find justice hard to accomplish. The next section discusses how justice should be done, and the last asks the question of whether justice will ever be realized.

Is Justice Possible? includes anecdotes about justice not being done, or being delayed significantly. It also includes basic definitions and different ways American Christians can pursue justice in political, public, and personal arenas. This is probably the most helpful section.

Overall, Is Justice Possible? is an easy read. It is a thin book that serves as a basic introduction to the topic. Those who have never given justice more than a passing consideration will find reading this beneficial.

I received this book free from Moody Publishers as part of their Moody Publishers Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, See Part 255

Monday, February 6, 2017

The Dog Who Was There by Ron Marasco

The Dog Who Was There by Ron Marasco tells the story of Christ's crucifixion from the point of view of a dog. There aren't a lot of details - most of the story takes place before Barley, the dog, encounters "The Kind Man" as he refers to Jesus. Barley witnesses the triumphal entry and then Christ's walk with his cross to Golgotha and subsequent crucifixion.

Barley has an interesting point of view and is a good storyteller. Those who don't handle descriptions of violence towards animals will need to avoid this book, as Barley doesn't have the easiest life. There are some engaging characters he meets, one of which gives us the opportunity to see the effect of The Kind Man on people's lives. How Barley ends up at the foot of the cross is an interesting twist of story telling.

The Dog Who Was There is easy to read and moves quickly. I don't know that I can wholeheartedly recommend it, simply because it is unexpectedly rough. But it is entertaining, and I think those who know in advance what they're getting into will enjoy this unique take on a timeless story.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

The Chamberlain Key by Timothy P. Smith

The Chamberlain Key:Unlocking the Biblical Code That Proves the Existence of God by Timothy P. Smith reads like it may have taken its plot from a thriller on the best seller list. Tales of prophetic dreams, hidden codes, and messages for the future make up the bulk of this book's text.

It is hard to accept the contents of The Chamberlain Key. Perhaps with more time to get used to the fantastical ideas, I could jump on board, but in just one reading and initial exposure, it's hard to swallow. That being said, the book itself is written in an easy to read, narrative style. Keeping up with everything was sometimes hard, but for the most part Smith makes what is I'm sure a very complex topic fairly easy to understand.

Smith makes it clear he is not publishing this information with any interest in self promotion. He actually goes a bit over the top stressing that, which gives what he says a bit more credibility. I'm neither discounting, nor endorsing the content. Anyone who finds the concept of messages hidden by God within the original Hebrew text of the Old Testament intriguing should read The Chamberlain Key for him/herself, but only if he/she is will to keep an open mind.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

The Good of Giving Up by Aaron Damiani


The Good of Giving Up: Discovering the Freedom of Lent by Aaron Damiani is a great introduction to the history, practice, and benefit of Lent for those who are unfamiliar with the practice. The author grew up in a tradition that did not celebrate Lent, was introduced to it as a young adult, and now pastors a church that celebrates Lent. His perspective is useful, having been on all sides of the issue.

Damiani splits his book into three parts: The Case for Lent, The Path of Lent, and Leading Others Through Lent. In the first part, Damiani gives a brief but comprehensive history of how Lent has been viewed and celebrated throughout church history. He also answers common objections from those who view Lent with suspicion. In the second part, he covers the key aspects of Lent including fasting, prayer, almsgiving, and confession. The last part is more of a guide for those in charge of leading groups through the season of Lent, though there is useful information for laymen as well.

As one who has never really practiced Lent, I found The Good of Giving Up informative and encouraging. It has a very humble tone that gives the reader information without putting any pressure on him/her to think a certain way about Lent. It is just the right length to be an introduction to a commonly misunderstood topic. The focus on Jesus being in relationship with Him ties the entire book together. I'd encourage anyone curious about Lent, those practicing it for the first time, or those just starting to lead others through it to read The Good of Giving Up.

I received this book free from Moody Publishers as part of their Moody Publishers Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, See Part 255

Thursday, January 26, 2017

How's Your Soul? by Judah Smith


How's Your Soul?: Why Everything that Matters Starts with the Inside You by Judah Smith is an easy to read primer on the importance of maintaining the health of one's soul. Using scripture as the basis of what a healthy soul needs, Smith elaborates on each need with personal anecdotes and analogies that help the reader relate to each need.

Smith is an entertaining writer. How's Your Soul? uses humor which makes the text both approachable and easy to relate to. Smith also maintains a good balance between being solidly based on scripture while not being overly spiritual. How's Your Soul? can be understood and appreciated by Christians and non-Christians alike. Smith makes each point relevant to a broad audience without compromising the supremacy of scripture.

I'd recommend How's Your Soul? to anyone who has ever felt the busy pace of life overwhelming them. Anyone who has ever felt that something isn't quite write with their inner self will benefit from this book.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Friday, January 20, 2017

Visioneering by Andy Stanley

Visioneering: Your Guide for Discovering and Maintaining Personal Vision the Revised and Updated Edition by Andy Stanley sets out a clear course for anyone who feels the burden of a vision. Using practical advice, the biblical story of Nehemiah, and experience from his life and others, Stanley walks the reader through the birth of a vision to seeing it through long term.

The story of Nehemiah is used throughout Visioneering to illustrate the principles Stanley puts forth. This ties the whole thing together and helps the reader remember key points such as distinguishing between  a good idea and a God idea, avoiding distractions, and the importance of maintaining one's moral authority. 

Much of what one reads in Visioneering could be mistaken for self help, positive thinking train of thought if taken out of context. The key difference is the ground these statements have in scripture.Stanley never wavers from the grounding a vision will have in God's plan both for an individual life and the world. 

The revised and updated edition includes questions at the end of every chapter to help the reader apply that chapter's principle to his or her vision. There is also a small group discussion guide included at the end of the book with advice for the discussion leader. Each "Building Block" is highlighted in the text, and there is a list of these blocks with page numbers included at the front of the book for easy reference. Like all of Stanley's books, Visioneering is easy to read and understand. I would recommend it to anyone who has an idea and could use some guidance as to how to best develop and pursue it. 

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Tough As They Come by SSG Travis Mills

Tough As They Come by SSG Travis Mills is the autobiography of one modern soldier who sustained and overcame catastrophic injuries while serving in Afghanistan. Part of the famous 82nd Airborne Division, Staff Sergeant Mills was six weeks into his third tour of duty when he triggered an IED. The explosion left him a quadruple amputee as he became the fourth such survivor of the war on terror.

SSG Mills' story is a pretty typical one until his injury. He recounts growing up a star football player in small town America. He enlisted after feeling aimless and unfulfilled during his short time in college. He met and married his wife in a whirlwind romance between his first and second tours, and they had a baby girl between his second and third tours.

The first three quarters of so of Tough As They Come is about SSG Mills' life before his injury. It includes amusing anecdotes from his childhood and stories about his experiences during his first two tours. As an infantryman and a paratrooper he saw a lot of action and served his second tour in the remotest, barest regions of Afghanistan. His personality comes through the description of his life. Its obvious he looks at things positively and uses humor to deal with tough things. He loves hard, works hard, and play hard. All of these things would come into play during the recovery from his injuries.

It's obvious SSG Mills doesn't view himself has a hero, though he is, just as are all the other men and women who have served our country. His tenacity and spirit are great examples for anyone facing adversity. Tough As They Come is easy to read as it feels like one is just listening to an entertaining storyteller. It's well written and appropriately paced. The excerpts of his wife's journals and other recollections from people in his life add a unique flavor that give credibility to Mills' character and personality.

I'd recommend this book to anyone interested in stories about overcoming adversity. Those interested in the stories of soldiers or the war on terror should also read this book.

Blogging for Books provided this book to me for free in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

God Made You Nose to Toes by Leslie Parrott

God Made You Nose to Toes by Leslie Parrott is a children's book about the different body parts God gave each of us. From our hands and feet to our ears and eyes, God gave us parts that have ability to do everything we need.

By comparing human body parts to that of different animals, the author communicates the uniqueness of each of God's creatures. Even though they may look different from others, God gave each of us the parts He did. The message is that God loves us just as we are, and is interested in what makes us unique. Its a perfect message for any child, especially as they begin to notice differences between people. 

This is a very sturdy children's book that is perfect for the littlest readers. The cover is padded and the corners rounded. The pages are made of thick cardboard and are easy to turn. Each page only has four lines of text, and everything rhymes. The rest of the pages are covered in beautiful, vibrantly colored illustrations. The bright colors and large pictures should catch and hold the attention of any child. I'd recommend this book to anyone with a child.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookLook book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255