Monday, May 6, 2013

Hitler's Cross by Erwin W. Lutzer


 Hitler's Cross
Hitler's Cross by Erwin W. Lutzer is  about the church in Germany during the rise and reign of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party. It traces the historical, social, economic, and political circumstances that shaped Germany during the post WWI era and allowed Hitler to start WWII.  The church's silence and inaction during this crucial time in world history is examined in light of the aforementioned factors, as well as the spiritual climate that allowed such a shocking lack of engagement with the world.

Lutzer, a pastor and theologian, structures his book in a logical, chronological order. He examines the history of the German people and the German church which helps explain the state both were in when Adolf Hitler and the Nazis came on the scene. The book is set up as a conflict between two crosses and two saviors: Christ and the cross, and Hitler and the swastika. Lutzer shows how Hitler and the swastika came to reign over Christ and the cross in Germany for a period of time. However, he makes sure to point out that God was always in control and that He was and is the ultimate victor. The swastika may have "reigned" for a bit, but Christ and the cross were never beaten. This is mainly highlighted through the life and efforts of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the Confessing Church.

Overall, the book was OK. I was a bit taken back by the preachiness of the commentary about modern day America and the parallels the author sees between now and Nazi Germany. I expected more of a straightforward historical account, and found the continual interjections somewhat disrupting. Other than that, Hitler's Cross contains good information, and I would recommend it to anyone interested in WWII, church history, or sociology.

I received this book free from Moody Publishers as part of their Moody Publishers Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255